Types of Surgery for Epilepsy

 

Epilepsy pic
Epilepsy
Image: Epilepsy.org

Dr. Ilyas Munshi serves as a privately practicing neurosurgeon in Lafayette, Louisiana. Experienced in treating a comprehensive range of conditions of the brain and spinal cord, Dr. Ilyas Munshi maintains a particular focus on surgical treatment of epilepsy.

When a patient’s epilepsy indicates that surgery might be the most appropriate option, the surgeon takes into consideration the type of epilepsy when determining the procedure type. The majority of patients who undergo epilepsy surgery receive what surgeons call a resection, in which the surgeon removes the area of the brain responsible for the patient’s seizures. This is the form of epilepsy surgery with the highest success rate for reducing or stopping seizure activity.

Patients who do not undergo a resective surgery may instead be candidates for a disconnective procedure. Unlike a resection, which is potentially curative, these surgeries primarily aim to stop the spread of seizures and thus limit their severity.

The disconnective surgery may be helpful if a patient’s seizure activity takes place in multiple parts of the brain or in a part of the brain on which surgery is too risky. A corpus callosotomy, for example, enables the surgeon to cut off the nerve connections between the two halves of the brain, thus preventing inter-hemispheric seizure spread. Rarely, a surgeon will instead choose to perform a multiple subpial transection, which can provide some relief for frequent and severe seizures by making incisions into multiple relevant parts of the brain.

Congress of Neurological Surgeons 2017 Annual Meeting

Congress of Neurological Surgeons  pic
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Image: cns.org

A graduate of Rush Medical College in Chicago, Ilyas Munshi, MD, serves as a neurosurgeon in Lafayette, Louisiana. Dr. Ilyas Munshi remains active in his professional community and belongs to the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS), which will hold the 2017 CNS Annual Meeting October 7 through 11.

The CNS Annual Meeting will take place at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center and will feature a robust scientific program with presentations and posters on the latest neurosurgery research. Attendees can choose from a variety of lunch and dinner seminars, with titles including Hematology and Coagulation for Neurosurgeons; Peripheral Nerve Entrapment Syndromes: Diagnosis and Management; Spinal Column Metastases Management; Controversies in Spinal Deformity Surgery; and Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Brain Tumors.

This year’s featured speakers include Alan R. Cohen, Director of the American Board of Neurological Surgery, and Geoff Colvin, a best-selling author and the senior editor-at-large of Fortune magazine.A graduate of Rush Medical College in Chicago, Ilyas Munshi, MD, serves as a neurosurgeon in Lafayette, Louisiana. Dr. Ilyas Munshi remains active in his professional community and belongs to the Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS), which will hold the 2017 CNS Annual Meeting October 7 through 11.

The CNS Annual Meeting will take place at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center and will feature a robust scientific program with presentations and posters on the latest neurosurgery research. Attendees can choose from a variety of lunch and dinner seminars, with titles including Hematology and Coagulation for Neurosurgeons; Peripheral Nerve Entrapment Syndromes: Diagnosis and Management; Spinal Column Metastases Management; Controversies in Spinal Deformity Surgery; and Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Brain Tumors.

This year’s featured speakers include Alan R. Cohen, Director of the American Board of Neurological Surgery, and Geoff Colvin, a best-selling author and the senior editor-at-large of Fortune magazine.

Using Spinal Injections for the Treatment of Spinal Stenosis

 

Spinal Stenosis pic
Spinal Stenosis
Image: mayfieldclinic.com

Dr. Ilyas Munshi is currently a neurosurgeon in Lafayette, Louisiana. He focuses on the treatment of brain and spine complications. As part of his practice, Dr. Ilyas Munshi uses spinal injections to treat his patients.

A spinal injection is a combination of a local anesthetic pain relief medicine and corticosteroid. A corticosteroid is a strong anti-inflammatory medication. The local anesthetic medication will provide pain relief immediately. The spinal injection will be injected in the space around the nerve roots and spinal cord. An injection is usually used when the symptoms are coming from spinal stenosis, and other nonsurgical treatments aren’t working the way they should to take care of the pain.

Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of open spaces within the spine and it can put pressure on the spinal cord, as well as the nerves that travel throughout the spine to the legs and arms. Spinal stenosis usually appears in the neck and lower back. Lumbar spinal stenosis can cause pain that comes from the lower spine and goes down to the legs and hips. The injections may relieve pain for 2-3 weeks. The injections will help manage pain, but will not cure spinal stenosis.

Understanding Hydrocephalus

Hydrocephalus pic
Hydrocephalus
Image: hopkinsallchildrens.org

At his private practice, Dr. Ilyas Munshi, a board-certified neurosurgeon, cares for people with hydrocephalus as well as a variety of other spine and brain issues. A physician active in his specialist community, Dr. Ilyas Munshi belongs to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

Hydrocephalus is a serious condition wherein cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulates in the ventricles of the brain. CSF plays a key role in protecting and nourishing the brain and other nervous tissues, but if the fluid is not kept in proper balance, it can exert undue pressure on the brain and cause permanent tissue damage.

Doctors see hydrocephalus in patients ranging from new born infants to the elderly. Symptoms of the condition include headaches, vision problems, loss of balance, memory issues, and nausea. If hydrocephalus goes undiagnosed or untreated, it often results in the patient’s death.

Modern treatments for CSF accumulation in the brain frequently involve surgically inserting a shunt to help the liquid drain, thus reducing pressure on the brain tissue. The treatment is effective for many, allowing them to recover and live a normal life.

Learning About Pituitary Gland Tumors

 

Pituitary Gland Tumors pic
Pituitary Gland Tumors
Image: cancer.gov

Dr. Ilyas Munshi got his medical degree from Rush College in Chicago and completed his residency in neurosurgery through the prestigious University of Chicago program. Having been named one of Newsweek’s 2011 list of leaders in neurosurgery, Ilyas Munshi specializes in spine and peripheral nerve surgery and he has a special interest in treating tumors on the pituitary gland.

The pituitary gland controls many of the body’s functions, including metabolism, bone growth, melanin production in the skin, sperm production, and menstrual cycle regulation. While pituitary gland tumors are part of the endocrine system and are not technically brain tumors, they are located so close to the brain that treatment usually involves both a neurosurgeon and an endocrinologist.

Most pituitary gland tumors are benign, and appear to be related to hereditary risk factors rather than any environmental cause. The commonest treatment for these types of tumors is brain surgery to remove the tumor, but depending on the patient and other factors, radiation or hormonal drug therapy may also be effective.

Dispelling Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery Myths

North American Spine Society pic
North American Spine Society
Image: spine.org

A board-certified neurosurgeon, Ilyas Munshi, MD, treats patients out of his private practice in Lafayette, Louisiana. In addition to other procedures, he specializes in treating brain tumors and spinal injuries. Dr. Ilyas Munshi is also an active member of the North American Spine Society.

Minimally invasive spinal surgery is a delicate topic to broach, so it’s no surprise that there is a lot of misinformation out there surrounding the topic. Here are three common myths about the procedure and why they are wrong.

Spinal surgery is the last resort

Having surgery on one’s spine can be a frightening proposition. That’s why it’s common for people to try any and all other treatments before deciding to go ahead with a surgery. Some conditions, however, require surgical intervention. Minimally invasive spinal surgery is a commonly used technique in these instances.

Spinal surgery means a long recovery

With advances in minimally invasive procedures, the recovery time for spinal surgery has been reduced significantly. Some patients who receive minimally invasive spinal surgery are even discharged on the same day.

Lasers are just as good as spine surgery

There have been no studies that prove lasers are as effective as surgery for the spine. Additionally, there are no health authorities in the United States who recommend lasers. There simply is no evidence that lasers offer alternative solutions to spinal surgery.

About the Craniotomy Procedure

Craniotomy Procedure pic
Craniotomy Procedure
Image: surgeryencyclopedia.com

As a board-certified neurosurgeon, Dr. Ilyas Munshi leads a private practice in Lafayette, Louisiana. There, Dr. Ilyas Munshi regularly performs craniotomy procedures.

The term “craniotomy” refers to the technique that a neurosurgeon uses to expose the brain for the purpose of performing a particular surgical procedure. Often used to provide access for procedures like tumor removal or aneurysm repair, it also allows surgeons to assess the brain tissue or relieve pressure under the skull. The procedure involves the removal of a section of bone from the skull, which when removed is known as the bone flap.

After the patient is shaved and sedated, the surgeon secures the patient to a device that keeps the head still. The surgeon then identifies the spot to be treated and creates an incision that allows him or her to lift up the skin and muscle above the skull. Once the skull is exposed, the surgeon drills a series of small holes to guide the removal of the bone flap. The surgeon then uses a saw to connect the drilled holes and separate the bone flap from the rest of the skull.

Once the bone flap is removed, the surgeon cuts through a protective membrane called the dura to expose the brain. This exposure allows the surgeon to perform the necessary procedure. After the procedure is complete, the surgeon closes the dura and replaces the bone flap. Screws and plates, permanently fitted, attach the bone flap to the skull and hold it in place.